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Last Modified:
Apr 26, 2014

Miscellaneous



This page documents library components that don't really fit in anywhere else. They all follow the same conventions as the rest of the library.


Objects
Global Functions
SQLite
Testing
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bit_stream



This object represents a middle man between a user and the iostream classes that allows single bits to be read/written easily from/to the iostream classes

#include <dlib/bit_stream.h>
Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
bit_stream_kernel_1:
This implementation is done by buffering single bits in the obvious way.
kernel_1a
is a typedef for bit_stream_kernel_1
kernel_1a_c
is a typedef for kernel_1a that checks its preconditions.

Extensions to bit_stream

bit_stream_multi

This extension gives a bit_stream object the ability to read/write multiple bits at a time.

Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
bit_stream_multi_1:
This implementation is done by calling the read/write functions in the bit_stream kernel.
multi_1a
is a typedef for bit_stream_kernel_1 extended by bit_stream_multi_1
multi_1a_c
is a typedef for multi_1a that checks its preconditions.
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bound_function_pointer



This object represents a function with all its arguments bound to specific objects.

This implementation is done using type erasure and placement new. This means that it never allocates memory on the heap and instead stores everything on the stack.



#include <dlib/bound_function_pointer.h>
Detailed Documentation

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byte_orderer



This object provides a simple type safe mechanism to convert data to and from network and host byte orders. I.e. to convert things between big and little endian byte ordering.

#include <dlib/byte_orderer.h>
Detailed Documentation

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console_progress_indicator



This object is a tool for reporting how long a task will take to complete.

#include <dlib/console_progress_indicator.h>
Detailed Documentation

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copy_functor



This is a templated function object that makes copies of something.

#include <dlib/algs.h>
Detailed Documentation

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database



This object is a C++ wrapper around a SQLite database connection handle and therefore represents a SQLite database file.

Note that this wrapper is targeted at SQLite Version 3. To use it you must make sure you link your application with SQLite. However, if you use CMake and dlib's default CMakeLists.txt file then it will get setup automatically. This is assuming sqlite3 is properly installed on your system. On ubuntu you can get it by installing the libsqlite3-dev package. Or you can always download the SQLite source and compile it straight into your application (download the amalgamation).



#include <dlib/sqlite.h>
Detailed Documentation

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default_memory_manager



This is a memory manager object which simply calls new and delete directly (i.e. it doesn't really do anything). It is the default memory manager used by most of the objects in dlib.

#include <dlib/algs.h>
Detailed Documentation

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deserialize



This is actually a set of overloaded functions which provide the ability to restore an object's state from an input stream. Currently all dlib container classes, non pointer C++ intrinsics, std::string, std::vector, std::map, std::set, std::complex, dlib::bigint, dlib::uint64, dlib::int64, C style arrays, and dlib::vector objects are serializable.

You can also use serialize() and deserialize() to read/write Google protocol buffer objects. However, note that dlib::serialize() writes additional delimiting bytes at the start of each protocol buffer message. We do this because Google protocol buffers are not self-delimiting on their own. This means that you can't write more than one protocol buffer object to an output stream unless you include some kind of delimiter between the messages. So dlib takes care of this for you by prefixing each message with its length in bytes. In particular, the number of bytes is encoded as a 32bit little endian integer.



#include <dlib/serialize.h>
Detailed Documentation

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dlib_testing_suite



This library comes with a command line driven regression test suite. All the testing code is located in the dlib/test folder. If you want to build it and test the library on your system you can use the makefile at dlib/test/makefile (you may have to edit it to make it work on your system) or use the CMake CMakeLists.txt file at dlib/test/CMakeLists.txt to build it.

What you may find more useful however is the testing framework itself. It uses a fairly simple and modular design. Each test is contained in its own cpp file and when compiled into the program it automatically shows up in the list of tests to run. If you want to use the testing framework all you need to do is add the files dlib/test/tester.h, dlib/test/tester.cpp, and dlib/test/main.cpp to your project and then add cpp files that contain your tests (see dlib/test/example.cpp and dlib/test/example_args.cpp for some examples).

From the command line you can choose to run all the installed tests, enable or disable the loggers, set various logging levels, specify how many times to run the tests, or pick just one or two tests to run at a time rather than the entire suite. The output of the program, that is, its return value from main() is the number of failed tests. So if every test succeeds then it returns 0.



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error



This is the base exception class from which all exceptions in this library inherit.

#include <dlib/error.h>
Detailed Documentation

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int16



This is just a typedef for a 16 bit integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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int32



This is just a typedef for a 32 bit integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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int64



This is just a typedef for a 64 bit integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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int8



This is just a typedef for an 8 bit integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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logger



This component is a logging output stream in the style of the log4j logger available for Java.

#include <dlib/logger.h>
Detailed Documentation
C++ Example Programs: logger_ex.cpp, logger_ex_2.cpp, logger_custom_output_ex.cpp, pipe_ex.cpp


Extensions to logger

config_file

This extension provides the configure_loggers_from_file() function which reads a configuration file from disk that sets up all your loggers.

Detailed Documentation
extra_logger_headers

This extension contains additional logger headers you may chose to use instead of the default one.

Detailed Documentation
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make_mfp



This function is a simple factory for creating member_function_pointer objects without needing to know the necessary template arguments for the member_function_pointer.

#include <dlib/member_function_pointer.h>
Detailed Documentation

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member_function_pointer



This object represents a member function pointer. It is useful because instances of this object can be created without needing to know the type of object whose member function we will be calling.

The implementation of this object is done using type erasure and placement new. This means that it never allocates memory on the heap and instead stores everything on the stack.



#include <dlib/member_function_pointer.h>
Detailed Documentation
C++ Example Programs: member_function_pointer_ex.cpp

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memory_manager



This object represents a memory pool.

#include <dlib/memory_manager.h>
Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
memory_manager_kernel_1:
This memory manager implementation allocates objects one at a time when there are allocation requests. Then when there is a deallocate request the returning object is placed into a list of free blocks if that list has less than max_pool_size blocks in it. Subsequent allocation requests will be serviced by drawing from the free list whenever it isn't empty. Array allocations, on the other hand, are not managed at all but are passed directly on to new and delete.

When this object's max_pool_size template parameter is set to 0 it simply calls new and delete directly and doesn't function as a memory pool.

kernel_1a
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 0
kernel_1b
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 10
kernel_1c
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 100
kernel_1d
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 1000
kernel_1e
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 10000
kernel_1f
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_1 with a max_pool_size of 100000
memory_manager_kernel_2:
This memory manager implementation allocates memory in blocks of chunk_size*sizeof(T) bytes. All the sizeof(T) sub-blocks are kept in a linked list of free memory blocks and are given out whenever an allocation request occurs. Also, memory is not freed until this object is destructed. Also note that array allocations are not managed at all but are passed directly on to new and delete.
kernel_2a
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_2 with a chunk_size of 10
kernel_2b
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_2 with a chunk_size of 100
kernel_2c
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_2 with a chunk_size of 1000
kernel_2d
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_2 with a chunk_size of 10000
kernel_2e
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_2 with a chunk_size of 100000
memory_manager_kernel_3:
This memory manager implementation allocates memory in blocks of chunk_size*sizeof(T) bytes. All the sizeof(T) sub-blocks are kept in a linked list of free memory blocks and are given out whenever an allocation request occurs. Note that array allocations are managed. So this object is just like kernel_2 but it also pools memory from array allocations (chunk_size has no effect with respect to array allocations, each array is allocated one at a time). Also, memory is not freed until this object is destructed.
kernel_3a
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_3 with a chunk_size of 10
kernel_3b
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_3 with a chunk_size of 100
kernel_3c
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_3 with a chunk_size of 1000
kernel_3d
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_3 with a chunk_size of 10000
kernel_3e
is a typedef for memory_manager_kernel_3 with a chunk_size of 100000
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memory_manager_global



This object represents some kind of global memory manager or memory pool.

#include <dlib/memory_manager_global.h>
Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
memory_manager_global_kernel_1:
This is implemented in the obvious way. See the code for details.
kernel_1a
is a typedef for memory_manager_global_kernel_1
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memory_manager_stateless



This object represents some kind of stateless memory manager or memory pool. Stateless means that all instances (instances of the same type that is) of this object are identical and can be used interchangeably. Note that implementations are allowed to have some shared global state such as a global memory pool. This object is also thread safe.

#include <dlib/memory_manager_stateless.h>
Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
memory_manager_stateless_kernel_1:
This implementation just calls new and delete. So it doesn't do anything special.
kernel_1a
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_1
memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2:
This implementation uses a global instance of a memory_manager object guarded by a mutex as its implementation.
kernel_2_1a
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1a
kernel_2_1b
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1b
kernel_2_1c
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1c
kernel_2_1d
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1d
kernel_2_1e
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1e
kernel_2_1f
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_1f
kernel_2_2a
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_2a
kernel_2_2b
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_2b
kernel_2_2c
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_2c
kernel_2_2d
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_2d
kernel_2_2e
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_2e
kernel_2_3a
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_3a
kernel_2_3b
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_3b
kernel_2_3c
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_3c
kernel_2_3d
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_3d
kernel_2_3e
is a typedef for memory_manager_stateless_kernel_2 that uses memory_manager_3e
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pipe



This is a first in first out queue with a fixed maximum size. It is suitable for passing objects between threads.

This object is optimized for speed, therefore, it uses global swap() to create a zero-copy method for moving objects around. For example, on a computer running Ubuntu 12.04 with a 2.67GHz Intel i7 920 CPU it is possible to pass over 4.4 million std::vector<int> objects a second between two threads. This is regardless of the number of ints in the std::vector objects. In particular, this test was done with 100,000 ints in each std::vector.

Finally, note that you can use the pipe as an efficient method to pass messages between two networked computers by using the bridge.



#include <dlib/pipe.h>
Detailed Documentation
C++ Example Programs: pipe_ex.cpp, pipe_ex_2.cpp, bridge_ex.cpp

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serialize



This is actually a set of overloaded functions which provide the ability to save an object's state to an output stream. Currently all dlib container classes, non pointer C++ intrinsics, std::string, std::vector, std::map, std::set, std::complex, dlib::bigint, dlib::uint64, dlib::int64, C style arrays, and dlib::vector objects are serializable.

You can also use serialize() and deserialize() to read/write Google protocol buffer objects. However, note that dlib::serialize() writes additional delimiting bytes at the start of each protocol buffer message. We do this because Google protocol buffers are not self-delimiting on their own. This means that you can't write more than one protocol buffer object to an output stream unless you include some kind of delimiter between the messages. So dlib takes care of this for you by prefixing each message with its length in bytes. In particular, the number of bytes is encoded as a 32bit little endian integer.



#include <dlib/serialize.h>
Detailed Documentation

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statement



This object represents a SQL statement which can be executed against a database object. In particular, this object is a C++ wrapper around a SQLite prepared statement.

Note that this wrapper is targeted at SQLite Version 3. To use it you must make sure you link your application with SQLite.



#include <dlib/sqlite.h>
Detailed Documentation

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std_allocator



This object is an implementation of an allocator that conforms to the C++ standard requirements for allocator objects. The M template argument is one of the dlib memory manager objects and this allocator implementation will do all of its memory allocations using whatever dlib memory manager you supply.

Thus, using this allocator object you can use any of the dlib memory manager objects with the containers in the STL or with any other object that requires an STL style allocator object.



#include <dlib/std_allocator.h>
Detailed Documentation
C++ Example Programs: std_allocator_ex.cpp

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sync_extension



This object represents a general extension to any object. This object gives any object which it extends an integrated rmutex and rsignaler object. The extended object will then be able to be treated as if it was also a rmutex and rsignaler.

#include <dlib/sync_extension.h>
Detailed Documentation

Implementations:
sync_extension_kernel_1:
This is implemented using a rmutex and rsignaler in the obvious way.
kernel_1a
is a typedef for sync_extension_kernel_1
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timeout



This object provides a simple way to implement a timeout.

#include <dlib/timeout.h>
Detailed Documentation

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timer



This object represents a timer that will call a given member function repeatedly at regular intervals.

The implementation of this object has a single master thread that does all the waiting. This master thread creates and dispatches threads to specific timer objects when they need to run their action functions. When a timer object isn't executing its action function then it doesn't have any thread allocated to it at all. So it is fairly efficient.



#include <dlib/timer.h>
Detailed Documentation
C++ Example Programs: timer_ex.cpp

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TIME_THIS



This is a macro function for timing blocks of code. Its form is TIME_THIS(whatever you want to time) It's pretty straight forward. It just prints the time it took to std::cout.

There is another version of this function called TIME_THIS_TO which takes as a parameter an ostream object to write its output to. Its form is TIME_THIS_TO(what you want to time, the output stream);



#include <dlib/time_this.h>
Detailed Documentation

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timing code blocks



This is a set of set of functions for timing blocks of code. Unlike TIME_THIS, it can be used to find the cumulative time spent on a block which is executed multiple times.

#include <dlib/timing.h>
Detailed Documentation

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transaction



This object is a tool for creating exception safe database transactions.

#include <dlib/sqlite.h>
Detailed Documentation

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uint16



This is just a typedef for a 16 bit unsigned integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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uint32



This is just a typedef for a 32 bit unsigned integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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uint64



This is just a typedef for a 64 bit unsigned integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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uint8



This is just a typedef for an 8 bit unsigned integer.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation

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vectorstream



This is an iostream object that reads and writes from an in-memory buffer. It functions very much the same way as the std::stringstream object. However, while the std::stringstream holds its buffer internally and it can only be accessed by copying it out, the vectorstream uses an external std::vector<char> as its buffer. That is, it holds a reference to an external vector and does not contain any internal buffers of its own.

This object is useful as a slightly more efficient alternative to the std::stringstream since you can avoid the overhead of copying buffer contents to and from the stream. This is particularly useful when used as a source or target for serialization routines.



#include <dlib/vectorstream.h>
Detailed Documentation

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zero_extend_cast



This is a global function that performs a zero extending cast from one integral type to another integral type.

#include <dlib/uintn.h>
Detailed Documentation